G. I. Samurai

G. I. Samurai


戦国自衛隊
Sengoku Jieitai
15th Century Self Defense Force

Also known as Time Slip
Director Kosei Sato
Action Director Shinichi Chiba
Producer Haruki Kadokawa
Original Story Ryo Hanmura
Screenplay Toshio Kamata
Photography Iwao Isayama
Art Hiroshi Ueda
Masuo Tsutsui
Sound Fumio Hashimoto
Lighting Katsumi Endo
Editor Masaya Inoue
Music Producer Haruki Kadokawa
Music Kentaro Haneda
Production Companies Toho, Kadokawa, Mifune Productions
Release Date December 15, 1979
Runtime 139 minutes
Poster

戦国自衛隊
Sengoku Jieitai
15th Century Self Defense Force

Staff
Director Kosei Sato
Action Director Shinichi Chiba
Producer Haruki Kadokawa
Original Story Ryo Hanmura
Screenplay Toshio Kamata
Photography Iwao Isayama
Art Hiroshi Ueda
Masuo Tsutsui
Sound Fumio Hashimoto
Lighting Katsumi Endo
Editor Masaya Inoue
Music Producer Haruki Kadokawa
Music Kentaro Haneda
Info
Also known as Time Slip
Production Companies Toho, Kadokawa, Mifune Productions
Release Date December 15, 1979
Runtime 139 minutes

While en route to a staging area for military exercises, a self defense force platoon is caught in a mysterious phenomenon that sends them back in time to the Sengoku era. The commanding officer, Iba, earns the trust of local lord Kagetora, who discerns that they are from the same tribe. When Kagetora’s enemies attack the soldiers, they retaliate with their advanced weaponry and award Kagetora an elusive victory. Kagetora, inspired by his newfound allies, determines to take the rule of the country for himself. Ono theorizes that if they attempt to disturb history, another rift will open to send them back to the present and prevent them from altering the timeline. Iba decides to join forces with Kagetora and continue their conquest of feudal Japan to this end.

Iba and Kagetora achieve numerous victories, but Iba also must deal with deserters and mutineers on his side. Yano, who has long held a grudge against Iba for a previous incident in which he was disciplined, steals the platoon’s boat and goes on a rampage around the nearby villages, stealing their food and kidnapping their women. Iba mounts a counteroffensive to kill Yano and the other mutineers. After the dust settles, Iba’s attitude changes and he pursues conquest with more fervor than before.

Iba fights in a brutal battle against Shingen, Kagetora’s primary rival, which whittles his forces down to five men and costs them all their vehicles, but which also opens the way for Kagetora to claim rulership of the country. Ono fears that history, rather than sending them back to their era, will simply kill them off instead to prevent further damage to the timeline. Iba refuses to back down, either, and confesses that he prefers the Sengoku era to their own because he’s allowed to live and fight as he wills. Kagetora’s family, however, fear Iba, and urge Kagetora to do away with him, since he has outlived his usefulness. Kagetora confronts Iba at an abandoned shrine, and executes him and the remaining soldiers. A grief stricken Kagetora gives the bodies a proper cremation and mourns his strange allies.